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Desenvolvimento Regional

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English
Did Lula and Dilma only favor  investments in the Northeast?
No, the country whole grew, but the North, Northeast and Midwest grew more rapidly and intensly. Investments in industry, such as refineries in the Northeast, and in infrastructure (railroads and highways in the Center West and Northeast, for example) were allocated to the states most in need.
 
English

The concentration of wealth, industries and investments in the Southeast for decades led to internal migration, which emptied lands in the Northeast and overcrowded outlying areas in the Rio-São Paulo metropolitan areas. Because of Lula’s and Dilma’s growth policies, now even in a time of drought Northeasterners no longer need to seek a better way of life away from home.

English

High interest rates, red tape and a high level of demand hindered both access to credit, where money was only available to those who already had money — that is, not to those that needed it. In the Lula and Dilma governments, it became easier for small consumers, micro- and small entrepreneurs to obtain loans from public banks, which also helped change lives both inside and on the outskirts of major cities in the Amazon and in Northeast regions.

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Raise and ensure real increases of the minimum wage directly benefited the North and Northeast regions of the country, precisely those with the highest percentage of workers whose income is at that level. In the Northeast, for example, where almost half of Brazilian workers and retirees who receive a minimum wage live, according to PNAD 2012, the increase in average income of the population was 5.4%, well over the national average, attracting new private investment and giving the regional economy new impetus.

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When he ran in the 2002election, Lula said Brazil needed to create 10 million jobs. The phrase was twisted and became a laughingstock among political opponents, who considered creating so many jobs to be impossible or absurd.

English

"With these resources [R$ 7 billion in the Semi-arid Harvest Plan], we will help the farmers of the semiarid regions resume production, restore herds and, what is very important, create water and food reserves for the dry months. We cannot accept that our farmers do not have water on their properties or food for their herds during the drought... We also want to recover and strengthen the production and consumption of regional foods such as, for example, cassava, and the raising of sheep and goats, because they are already adapted to the Semi-arid conditions."

English

"With these resources [R$ 7 billion in the Semi-arid Harvest Plan], we will help the farmers of the semiarid regions resume production, restore herds and, what is very important, create water and food reserves for the dry months. We cannot accept that our farmers do not have water on their properties or food for their herds during the drought... We also want to recover and strengthen the production and consumption of regional foods such as, for example, cassava, and the raising of sheep and goats, because they are already adapted to the Semi-arid conditions."

English

More income and more formal jobs led to higher growth in consumption in the North and Northeast: another almost immediate consequence was better quality of life prospects and a desire for a better future for the next generations. Between 2001 and 2012, enrollment in higher education has almost doubled in Brazil. In the North and Northeast, growth was even higher: 285.15% and 211.70%, respectively, considering census variations, including enrollment in public and private schools.

English

The funds to support agriculture and livestock raising added to the income transfer capacity of Bolsa Família (51.1% of the 50 million beneficiaries of the program are in the Northeast) explain a historical change at a time when the region is experiencing its worst drought in decades (compared to the worst periods in the 1950s and 1970s).  For the first time, we are not witnessing mass migration to the Southeast, or the looting of grocery stores and street markets and invasions of cities, so common in the past.

English