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Empregos e Salários

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English


Is it true that, on average, job creation was similar during the governments of Fernando Henrique and Lula and Dilma?
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Another survey by Data Popular Institute, in partnership with the Central Unica das Favelas (CUFA), of 2,000 residents of 63 Brazilian favelas shows that the C class has doubled in size in these communities over the last decade, similar to the growth seen in the country as a whole. The average salary is R$ 910.00. Improved employment and higher income boosted consumption: half of households has plasma or LCD TVs, computers and microwaves. Some 99% of residents have refrigerators, 91% have an iron, 20% own a car and 13% a bike.

English

A path of opportunity opened up for millions of young people during the Lula and Dilma governments, with more spaces in primary and middle schools, public and private universities and technical schools. (See here). And young people are taking advantage of the open doors to qualify and be better positioned for the labor market.

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Argentina's population is about 41 million and Colombia’s is around 47 million. These numbers help us understand the magnitude of the changes observed in Brazil during the last decade. In the Lula and Dilma governments, 42 million Brazilians entered C class, almost an entire Columbia and more than all of Argentina.

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More job opportunities and higher wages have benefited segments of Brazilian society that were historically marginalized: blacks, people in the North and Northeast, rural workers. Of every 100 people who joined the C class between 2002 and 2012, 75 were black or mixed race - that is, three out of four people. In the Northeast, the C class has grown from 22% to 42% of total population, according to the Secretariat for Strategic Affairs of the Presidency, in a study entitled Middle Voices of the Middle Class.

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The social rise of millions of Brazilians has brought to light the prejudices of minority sectors of society that are uncomfortable sharing space, once held exclusively by certain elitist groups, with Brazil’s working people: doormen, manicurists, construction workers, couriers, mechanics, shop workers, retired people. People who work hard to earn their money and have every right to consume, travel and go to places where they had no access before Lula’s and Dilma’s governments.

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