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Direitos Humanos

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"This creation [of the National Truth Commission] demonstrates the commitment of Brazil to defend human rights internally, as is done elsewhere in the world."

Navi Pillay, UN Human Rights High Commissioner

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"Brazil is among the most influential democracies in the world, both on regional and global issues, and in recent years has emerged as an increasingly important voice in the debate on international responses to human rights problems.

Human Rights Watch (World Report 2014)

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In August 2006, Brazil took a historic step towards shaping its own future by choosing to recall its past. With the institution of the Project to Promote the Right to Memory and Truth (DMV), Brazil began to recover and disclose hidden passages of the years when it was being ruled by a military dictatorship.

An important battle front was the search for the remains of disappeared political activists, reconstruction of information about a past marked by violence and human rights violations, and official recognition by the state of the mistakes made during the dictatorial period.

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Lula and Dilma have undertaken to eradicate from the nation’s life the dark legacy of dictatorship – torture. In 2005, Lula’s administration implemented the Integrated Action Plan to Prevent and Combat Torture (PAIPCT), whose objective is to impede and otherwise prevent the practice of torture, in addition to increasing the possibility of punishing torturers. In 2013, President Dilma signed Law 12,847 , which created the National System for the Prevention and Fight Against Torture (SNPCT).

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Arrival ceremony in Brasilia of the remains of President João Goulart Photo: Roberto Stuckert Filho/PR

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Since work on the National Truth Commission began in 2012, Brazilians were finally able to come to terms with some of history’s still open wounds.

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For the first time, Brazil investigates the hidden facts of the military dictatorship

“Brazil deserves the truth, newer generations deserve the truth and, above all, those who have lost friends and relatives, and who continue to suffer as if [those individuals had] died again and always, every day, deserve factual truth.”

In 2005, President Lula received an audience at the Palácio do Planalto (the official workplace of the president of Brazil) from members of the National Movement for the Reintegration of Persons Afflicted by Hansen’s Disease (MORHAN), who presented him with proposals for improving the quality of life for this segment of society.

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Launched in 2012 by Banco do Brasil, BB’s Accessible Credit program offers financing for products (motorized wheelchairs, portable braille computers, vehicle adaptations, etc.), offering amounts between R$ 70 and R$ 30,000 (US$ 25 and US$ 10,500), at interest rates of between 0.41% and 0.45% per month. As of mid-July 2014, 21,102 transactions were carried out, totaling R$ 122.2 million (US$ 42.8 million).

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Implemented by Brazil’s Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation and the Brazilian Innovation Agency (FINEP), the National Innovation Program for Assistive Technology aims to support the development of products, methodologies, strategies, practices, and innovative services that increase the autonomy, welfare and quality of life of people with disabilities.

FINEP funding is made available to universities, research institutes, and companies that undertake innovative research with high technological risk associated with market opportunities.

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