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Seven of the 12 stadiums that were built or refurbished for the 2014 World Cup received Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification as constructions that demonstrate the adoption of sustainability concepts.

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The 2014 World Cup was also one for the record books in terms of solid waste collection for recycling. Recycling cooperatives were out in force in the 12 event stadiums to recover and separate wastes left behind by fans during the matches. In the city of Fortaleza alone, 90 tons of waste were collected from Castelão Stadium, its grass, and the Iracema Beach embankment, where a Fan Fest was held. These activities involved 350 collectors from 17 institutions.

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Brazil hosts an all-time best World Cup and confirms its position as a global champion of sustainability

Brazil built sustainable stadiums and compensated by nearly ten times for the greenhouse gas emissions generated during the 2014 World Cup / Photo: Paul rsmenezes

Established in 2011, Brazil’s National Climate Change Fund (Climate Fund) has since invested R$ 170 million (US$ 60 million), of which R$ 90 million (US$ 32 million) has been made available in the form of grants, while R$ 80 million (US$ 28 million) has been offered as financing for initiatives.

The fund supports mitigation of the effects of climate change and adaptation projects for vulnerable populations, as well as the establishment of guidelines and other instruments that will enable the implementation of Brazil’s National Climate Change Policy.

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Learn more about the objectives of Brazil’s National Climate Change Plan:

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Learn more about the plan’s goals:

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Brazil surprised the world and took on a voluntary commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to 38.9%

In 2010, a year after the United Nations Conference on Climate Change in Copenhagen, Denmark, Brazil set an example for other countries by taking on a bold and voluntary commitment to reduce, by 2020, its projected greenhouse gas emissions from 36.1% to 38.9%.

The new law strengthens the obligation to regularize the agrarian and environmental status of rural properties, particularly through the Rural Environmental Registry (CAR).

To implement the CAR , the Dilma administration created and placed at the disposal of all states an electronic system, accessible via www.car.gov.br, through which the compulsory, nationwide registration of all rural properties can be carried out. By early August 2014, 285,000 properties had been registered using the National Rural Environmental Registry System (SICAR).

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Following a review of the approved legislation from various federal ministries – Environment; Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply; Agrarian Development; Planning, Budget and Management; Mines and Energy; Science, Technology and Innovation; Cities – and the Attorney General’s Office, President Dilma used her line item veto authority to strike from the legislation those aspects that were contrary to the public interest or unconstitutional.

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In 2012, one of the most sensitive and controversial pieces of Brazilian legislation was finally approved – the new Forestry Code, whose previous version dated back to 1965.